HAPPY SAINTS PATRICK'S DAY - The Origin of Irish Coffee March 17 2016

Like FosterHobbs Coffee, the origin of the cocktail, Irish Coffee, has a link to aviation.

It was invented at Foynes, a small town in the West of Ireland, near Limerick, which had the main airport for Flying Boats between America and Europe. By 1940, the airport was abuzz with many American VIP's from the world of politics and Hollywood.

Weather conditions along the West coast of Ireland could change as quick as it took to refuel the planes and many times, flights would have to be cancelled and the passengers would have to spend the night in Foynes.

One winter night, in 1942, a flight left Foynes for Botwood in Newfoundland and then on to New York. After several hours of battling a storm, the pilot decided to turn back to Foynes. A new restaurant there, under the direction of a young Irish Chef, Joe Sheridan, was given heads up of the arriving plane and worked to be ready for the passengers that would be both cold and tired.

Joe Sheridan decided to prepare something special to warm the passengers up. He brewed dark, rich coffee, added in some Irish whiskey, a little brown sugar and floated freshly whipped cream on top of each cup. The story goes that after drinking the concoction an American passenger asked, "Hey Buddy, is this Brazilian coffee?"

"No," said Joe, "that's Irish Coffee."